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Travel Restrictions, Border Closures (by Country)

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Africa

Angola: From March 3, foreign nationals from China, South Korea, Iran, Italy, Nigeria, Egypt, Algeria and other countries or regions with confirmed cases are prohibited from entering Angola. From March 20 until further notice, Angola will suspend all international flights, close the land ports with neighboring countries, and prohibit passenger ships from docking at Angola ports.

Benin: From March 19, 2020, unnecessary travel to Benin is prohibited. All persons seeking to enter will be screened for COVID-19 and those showing symptoms will be quarantined. Persons arriving at Cotonou Cadjehoun Airport will be tested for COVID-19 with a second test to be administered after 15 days. Those who test positive will be sent to quarantine at designated facilities.

Botswana: From March 28, 2020, all international flights are suspended. A state of emergency is in effect and all persons currently in Botswana are expected to practice strict physical distancing. Movement across border checkpoints is restricted. Botswana nationals returning from aboard must undergo a 14-day quarantine.

Burkina Faso: From March 21, 2020, all air, land, and sea border checkpoints are closed until further notice.

Burundi: International passenger flights are suspended. 

Cameroon: From March 18 until further notice, all borders will be closed closed, all international flights will suspended, except for freight flights and ships that transport consumer goods all airports will no longer issue entry visa.

Cape Verde: Cape Verde has suspended all international passenger flights.

Central African: The Central African Republic has closed Bangui M’Poko International Airport (BGF) with exceptions for commercial, humanitarian, medevac, and technical stops. Travelers arriving from other countries must self-quarantine for 21 days upon arrival.

Chad: All travelers will undergo temperature check and hand disinfection at N'Djamena International Airport, all travelers from high risk countries or regions are subject to a 14-day medical observation. The government has decided to suspend flights to N'Djamena from midnight on March 19.

Comoros: Comoros has suspended all flights into the country.

Congo: From March 20, all flights from countries at risk have been suspended, except cargo. All passengers residing in countries at risk have to postpone their travel to DRC. All travelers will be screened, suspected cases will be subject to a 14-day quarantine, those tested positive will be transferred to hospitals.

Cote d'Ivoire: From March 22, all borders, by land, sea and air, will be closed to human traffic. This closure will not apply to goods, supplies and cargo.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: From March 20, all flights from countries at risk have been suspended, except cargo. All passengers residing in countries at risk have to postpone their travel to DRC. All travelers will be screened, suspected cases will be subject to a 14-day quarantine, those tested positive will be transferred to hospitals.

Djibouti: All flights to/from Djibouti will be suspended except cargo flights effective from March 18.
Equatorial Guinea: Equatorial Guinea has closed its borders and suspended all commercial flights to and from the country on March 15, 2020.

Eritrea: Eritrea has not implemented any entry restrictions but arriving travelers will be screened at Asmara International Airport (ASM). Travelers arriving from China must report their travel history and may be quarantined at designated hospitals.

Eswatini: Eswatini, also knowns as Swaziland, has restricted the entry of all travelers who are not returning citizens or legal residents. All arriving travelers will be subject to a mandatory 14-day quarantine in a designated location. All commercial flights out of the country have been suspended. The border is closed to everything except the transportation of goods and cargo.

Ethiopia: Ethiopia has closed its land borders. All travelers arriving in Ethiopia will be placed in a mandatory quarantine at the Ethiopian Skylight Hotel for 14 days at their own expense.

Gabon: Gabon has suspended all international flights.

Gambia: From March 23, 2020, the border with Senegal is closed and international flights are suspended. This policy does not apply to cargo or medical flights.

Ghana: Starting on March 17, Ghana banned entry to anyone who has been to a country with more than 200 coronavirus cases in the previous 14 days, unless they were official residents or Ghanaian nationals.

Guinea: Guinea's borders are closed until 15 July 2020.- This does not apply to nationals of Guinea with an approval from the government and a medical certificate stating that the passenger is not affected by Coronavirus (COVID-19).Guinea has suspended all commercial flights from countries with more than 30 confirmed cases of coronavirus (COVID-19). All embassies and consulates abroad have suspended issuances of visas from those countries.

Guinea-Bissau: From March 18, all land, air and sea borders of the country have been closed.

Kenya: Kenya has suspended all international flights except for aircraft in a state of emergency, operations related to humanitarian aid, medevac, and repatriation flights. All approved flights must provide completed passengers declaration forms and manifests to Port Health, Immigration and customs. All crew from international flights are required to self-isolate in designated airport hotels at Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta International Airport for the duration of their rest period. Nationals and residents of Kenya violating the self-quarantine requirement will be forcefully quarantined for 14 days.

Lesotho: Lesotho has restricted the entry of all travelers except for personnel involved in the transportation of medical supplies, food, and other goods.

Liberia: From March 16, travelers who have been in countries with more than 200 confirmed cases Coronavirus within 14 days before their arrival in Liberia will be denied entry. The Government of Liberia has declared a state of national health emergency, designating Montserrado and Margibi Counties as infected areas. Except for cargo, chattered and special flights, all commercial flights are ordered suspended as of March 23.

Madagascar: From March 14, all international flights have been suspended. Cruise ships are also banned from entering ports in Madagascar.

Malawi: The President on March 20 declared a state of disaster. From March 23 foreigners from coronavirus-hit countries would be barred from entering Malawi, while nationals and residents returning from affected countries would be subjected to self- or institutional quarantine. The Malawi government has also temporary suspended the issuance of visas to citizens of countries highly affected by the disease.

Mali: Mali will indefinitely suspend flights from countries affected by the virus starting on March 19, with the exception of cargo flights.

Mauritania: All travelers will be quarantined for 14 days. The borders with neighboring countries are closed, 6 border crossings remain open. All travelers will undergo temperature check at entry points. From March 17, all flights to Mauritania will be suspended.

Mauritius: Passengers are not allowed to transit or enter Mauritius. This does not apply to nationals or residents of Mauritius, their spouses and children. They will be placed in quarantine. Airline crew must stay in their hotel rooms.

Mozambique: The Government declared a  state of emergency until May 30, 2020, movements within the country and the entry of people across borders will be limited, all people who have travelled outside the country during the past month or have been in contact with people infected with COVID-19 have to undergo a mandatory 14-day quarantine.

Namibia: Namibia has closed its borders until further notice. Only Namibian nationals and permanent residents may enter the country. Travelers are subject to a 14-day quarantine upon their arrival. 

Effective June 30, the following measures will apply to all Namibians, Permanent Residence Permit holders, and certain categories of professionals with valid Work Permits who are able to travel to Namibia: on arrival, they must submit a COVID-19 PCR test and enter mandatory government-supervised quarantine at their own cost for a period of 14 days, or apply to be quarantined at the cost of the Government. Additionally, they must notify the Namibian Embassy or High Commission of their intent to travel to Namibia no less than two weeks prior to departure.

Niger: Niger has declared a state of emergency for the entire country, lasting through July 11. Niger has suspended all international flights to and from Niger. Commercial international flights into Niger’s international airports have been cancelled until further notice. Land borders have been closed since March 19, except for merchandise.          

Nigeria: On April 20, Nigeria extended the closure of its airspace and airports by two weeks, aviation minister Hadi Sirika said on Twitter. On April 13, Nigeria extended the lockdown in three key states of Lagos, Abuja and Ogun by 14 days to slow the spread of coronavirus in Africa's most populous country.

On March 18, the government announced it was restricting entry into the country for travelers from China, Italy, Iran, South Korea, Spain, Japan, France, Germany, the US, Norway, the UK, Switzerland and the Netherlands. Those coming from high-risk countries are asked to self-isolate for 14 days.

Nigeria expanded its restrictions on March 21 announcing it will close its two main international airports in the cities of Lagos and Abuja from March 23 for one month. The country also plans to suspend rail services starting on March 23.

Rwanda: From March 21 until further notice, borders are closed except for returning Rwandan citizens, and legal residents who will be subject to mandatory 14-day quarantine at designated locations. Travel between different cities and districts of the country is not permitted.

Senegal: From March 14, 2020, cruise ships are prohibited from docking at Senegalese ports and health screening at border checkpoints has been enhanced. From March 21, 2020, all flights are suspended with the exception of cargo flights. On May 30 , the Government of Senegal extended the suspension of all international air travel (with limited exceptions) through  June 30, 2020. 

On June 4, the Government of Senegal lifted the ban on travel between regions. Cars traveling between regions will be required to list all passengers they are transporting.  The daily curfew times were adjusted to 11:00 pm to 5:00 am.
 
On May 29, the Government of Senegal extended the current State of Emergency through July 2, 2020. The following measures remain in effect:
 
On June 29, the government lifted lockdown measures and announced air borders will reopen under certain conditions on July 15.

Sierra Leone: The government has lifted the prior restrictions on inter-district travel and the mandatory curfew has been shortened.  Curfew hours now extend from 11:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m.  There are no restrictions on inter-district travel.

Lungi International Airport closed to all passenger flights on March 22.  All land and sea borders are closed to the movement of people.

Somalia: From March 18, 2020, all land border checkpoints are closed, and all international flights are suspended.

South Africa: The ban on passenger vessels and cruise liners remains in place. Limited domestic air travel for business purposes will be allowed, subject to restrictions on the number of flights per day and authorization based on the reason for travel. 

Borders will remain closed to international travel, except for the repatriation of South African nationals and foreign citizens.

South Sudan: South Sudan has re-opened its borders; however, the South Sudanese government has suspended the issue of visas at its Embassies abroad, and all routine international commercial flights have been suspended since March 24.
Humanitarian and evacuation flights may still enter the country with an approval from the High-Level Task Force of South Sudan.

Travelers wishing to enter South Sudan must have a certificate showing they are free from coronavirus, issued no more than 48 hours ahead of their journey, and endorsed by a reputable medical provider. They will also need prior permission to enter the country from the National Task Force."

Sudan: On March 16, Sudan closed all airports, ports and land crossings. Only humanitarian, commercial and technical support shipments were excluded from the restrictions.

Tanzania: On May 18, 2020, the government announced that Tanzania has lifted flight restrictions and quarantine for travelers coming from abroad.

Togo: From March 20, 2020, all air, land, and sea border checkpoints are closed. This policy does not apply to goods, supplies, or cargo. From April 1, 2020, a state of emergency is in effect for 3 months and a nationwide curfew has been imposed. Togo has closed its borders. No travelers, including those with dual citizenship or a Togolese residency permit or national ID arriving on international flights are currently allowed entry in Togo.

Uganda: From March 25, 2020, all persons are prohibited from entering Uganda until further notice. All air, land, and sea border checkpoints are closed.
Western Sahara: No information available at this time.

Zambia: Zambia has closed all airports except for Kenneth Kaunda International Lusaka Airport (LUN).
All travelers and crew are subject to COVID-19 testing and will be quarantined for up to 14 days in a government-designated hotel at their own expense while waiting for the test result. Travelers with a negative result may leave the hotel but must spend the rest of the 14-day period self-isolating at home.

Zimbabwe: Zimbabwe has restricted the entry of all travelers except for Zimbabwean nationals and residents. All airports except for BUQ, HRE and VFA have been closed.

People returning to Zimbabwe are subject to a 21-day quarantine period at a government-approved facility, at their own cost.
Airports which are open are only accepting special categories of flights such as medical transport flights and flights transporting members of foreign missions, agencies or defense forces.


Asia

Armenia: The Government of Armenia declared a State of Emergency March 16, 2020 in response to the COVID-19 outbreak. On June 12, 2020, this State of Emergency was extended for an additional 30 days, through July 13, 2020. Actions include closure of schools and universities, prohibition of events with more than 10 persons in attendance, screening and quarantine measures, and restriction of entry into Armenia. Armenia has suspended entry into the country of any traveler who is not either a citizen of Armenia, a member of the family of a citizen, or a lawful resident of Armenia. Travelers who are permitted to enter Armenia are asked to complete health questionnaires and self-quarantine or self-monitor for 14 days. Georgia and Armenia have agreed to close the land border between their countries for a 10-day period, however this restriction has been extended indefinitely.
 
Azerbaijan: Restrictions on travelling to and out of Azerbaijan by air or land are in force until July 1, 2020, except for cargo and charter flights. All arriving travelers will be screened for symptoms. In case of any suspected exposure, the passenger — regardless of national origin or purpose of travel — will be evaluated and sent to specially designated facilities for quarantine.
 
Bangladesh: The Government of Bangladesh has authorized the resumption of limited international commercial flights to London and Doha.  Biman Airlines and Qatar Airways intend to operate limited flights in the coming weeks, though seats may be limited.

Foreign nationals with valid visas will be required to produce a medical certificate (with English translation) to be obtained within 72 hours of travel, indicating that he/she is COVID-19 negative. This medical certificate needs to be submitted on arrival at the Bangladesh point of entry (airport/seaport/land port).
 
The Bangladeshi government has suspended all visa-on-arrival services until further notice. Foreign nationals must visit a Bangladeshi embassy or consulate abroad and produce a valid medical certificate showing they have not tested positive for COVID-19 in order to obtain a visa. Persons arriving in Bangladesh via air will undergo screening for COVID-19 upon arrival. Foreign nationals arriving from countries impacted by COVID-19 must undergo a 14-day quarantine.

Bhutan: Bhutan has closed its borders. Bhutanese citizens may enter the country but will be held under mandatory quarantine. Essential services like food, medicine, and fuel may still enter the country.
 
Brunei: Brunei has restricted entry and transit to all travelers except for citizens and residents.

All visa issuances and exemptions are suspended. Travelers from other countries who wish to enter Brunei may apply to the Brunei Immigration Department for special authorization to enter the country by downloading the form provided on the Department’s website at www.immigration.gov.bn. Travelers who have received prior authorization to enter Brunei are subject to a COVID-19 test at a cost of BND1000.

Travelers arriving in Brunei will be encouraged to download the BruHealth app. Travelers without the app may be barred from accessing a number of facilities.
 
Cambodia: Cambodia has suspended all visa exemptions, visas on arrival, and e-visas. All arriving travelers except for diplomats must have official medical certificates issued by their origin countries no more than 72 hours prior to travel certifying that they have not tested positive for COVID-19. They must also have proof of insurance policies with minimum medical coverage of $50,000. 

All arriving travelers will be required to undergo COVID-19 testing in a reception area and will be quarantined for at least 14 days. If one or more travelers from a flight test positive, all passengers from the flight will be placed in a 14-day quarantine at a designated facility. If all passengers on a flight test negative, they will be allowed to quarantine at their residence/accommodation and will be tested again on the 13th day of their quarantine.

China: China has restricted entry and transit to all travelers except Chinese nationals, Hong Kong, Macau, or Taiwan passport holders, and travelers with diplomatic, service, courtesy or C visas, or visas issued after March 28, 2020.

Travelers arriving at PEK will be given a PCR test and quarantined for 14 days at a designated location in Beijing.

Travelers arriving at Shanghai Pudong (PVG) or Shanghai Hongqiao (SHA) must undergo Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) and a 14-day quarantine in designated places for medical observation.

Airline crew with a layover at the above airports must undergo NAT inside the passenger terminal, then self-isolate at their hotel temporarily before acquiring the NAT results.

Airline crew arriving at the above airports will be quarantined after their last shift, and must self-isolate in crew hotels during shift breaks.

Travelers arriving at Guangzhou (CAN) or Shenzhen (SZX) who live in or have been in France, Germany, Iran, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Spain, or the United States in the past 14 days must undergo 14-day quarantine at home or in designated places for medical observation. All passengers arriving at SZX will have a PCR test.

Travelers arriving at XMN will be quarantined for medical observation at designated hotels for 14 days at their own expense. This does not apply to travelers under 18 years old or above 70 years old, pregnant women, and travelers suffering from illness, who must apply for permission to undergo a 14-day quarantine at home.
 
Hong Kong: Hong Kong has restricted the entry of all travelers who are not Hong Kong passport holders, Permanent Identity Card holders, work or study visa holders, or British passport holders with “British Nationality (Overseas)” nationality with the right of abode in Hong Kong.

Travelers who have only been in China, Taiwan, or Macau in the past 14 days may still enter. Macau residents will immediately be taken back to Macau by coach upon arrival.

Hong Kong residents with an Identity card accompanied by a visa marked with “Permission to remain extended until” may enter Hong Kong within the validity of the permitted stay.

Airline crew, government officials, spouses and minor children of Hong Kong residents, and personnel endorsed by the HKSAR government to engage in anti-epidemic work may also enter.

All travelers eligible to enter Hong Kong must present a completed Health Declaration Form to the Department of Health upon arrival, and must undergo 14 days of compulsory quarantine.
 
India: From June 1, 2020, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering India and all international commercial flights are suspended. This policy does not apply to persons holding a business visa (other than a B-3 visa for sports) arriving on non-scheduled commercial or chartered flights, healthcare professionals, researchers, engineers, or technicians working at facilities in the Indian healthcare sector, engineers, managers, designers, or other specialists traveling to India on behalf of foreign firms with operations in India, and technical specialists or engineers travelling to India for the installation, repair, or maintenance of foreign-origin machinery and equipment. Such persons must obtain a new business or employment visa from an Indian embassy or consulate abroad prior to departing for India. This includes persons holding existing long-term multiple-entry business visas. Persons involved in the transport of essential goods and supplies may enter India; however, they must undergo medical screening for COVID-19 upon arrival.

All existing visas issued to foreign nationals are no longer valid. This policy does not apply to visas issued to diplomats or officials, persons working for the United Nations or other international organizations, or those holding employment or project visas. Foreign nationals holding regular visas or e-visas who are currently in India may apply online for an extension valid for up to 30 days from the date when international commercial flights resume. All visa-free arrangements for holders of Overseas Citizenship of India (OCI) cards are suspended. The following categories of OCI card holders are permitted to enter India: 1) minors born to Indian nationals abroad and who hold an OCI card, 2) persons who desire to travel to India for a family emergency, 3) spouses of Indian nationals who maintain a permanent residence in India, and 4) university students whose parents are Indian citizens currently living in India.
 
Prior to boarding transportation to India, all persons must agree to undergo a 14-day quarantine at their own expense comprising 7 days at a designated facility and 7 days of self-isolation at home. All persons must install the "Arogya Setu" mobile app and monitor their health status during quarantine. They must further agree to abide by all regulations issued by the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MoHFW) to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Indonesia: From April 2, 2020, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering Indonesia. This policy does not apply to persons who fall into one of the following categories:

1) Those who hold a Temporary Stay Permit or a Permanent Stay Permit;
2) Those who hold an Indonesian diplomatic visa or service visa, or those who hold Indonesian diplomatic stay or service permits;
3) Those engaged in medical, food, or humanitarian aid services;
4) Crews of land, sea, or air transportation;
5) Foreign nationals working on national strategic projects.
    
All persons (including Indonesian nationals) arriving from abroad are required to carry a health certificate showing a negative result for COVID-19 using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. The certificate must be issued by a recognized health authority no more than 7 days prior to departure for Indonesia. Failure to produce a valid certificate may result in denial of entry. 

Japan:  As of May 27, 2020, foreign nationals who fall into either of the following categories are prohibited from entering Japan:
(1) Foreign nationals who have visited any of the following locations within 14 days of their arrival in Japan:
Africa: Cape Verde, Cote d’ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Mauritius, Morocco, Sao Tome and Principe, South Africa
Asia: Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Brunei Darussalam, Hong Kong SAR, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Macau SAR, Mainland China, Malaysia, Maldives, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Thailand, Vietnam
Europe: Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Kosovo, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, North Macedonia, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Vatican City
Middle East: Bahrain, Israel, Iran, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates
North America: Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Canada, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Honduras, El Salvador, Mexico, Panama, Saint Kitts and Nevis, United States
Oceania: Australia, New Zealand
South America: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Uruguay

(2) Persons holding Chinese passports issued in Hubei Province of Zhejiang Province.

Quarantine Requirements
(1) All persons (including Japanese nationals) who have visited any of the above-listed locations within 14 days of their arrival in Japan must undergo a polymerase chain reaction (PRC) test for COVID-19.
(2) Regardless of origin, all persons (including Japanese nationals) must undergo a 14-day quarantine at a designated location and refrain from using public transportation.

Visa Restrictions
The Japanese government has suspended the validity of single- and multiple-entry visas issued by Japanese embassies or consulates in numerous countries and regions prior to specific dates. Visa exemption agreements with numerous countries is suspended. Visa exemptions for holders of APEC Business Travel Cards issued by several countries is suspended. A complete list of visa suspensions is available from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan website.
 
Kazakhstan: Foreign nationals are prohibited from entering Kazakhstan until further notice. This policy does not apply to diplomats and members of international organizations. From April 1, 2020, all persons entering Kazakhstan from abroad will undergo laboratory tests for COVID-19. Those who test positive will be transferred to an infectious disease hospital for treatment. Those who test negative must self-isolate at home for 14 days. From April 4, 2020, Kazakhstan's borders with China, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, and Uzbekistan are closed.
 
Korea, North: North Korea has shut down all of its air and railway routes across its borders with China and is keeping all foreigners arriving in the country via China isolated for up to one month.
 
Korea, South: Passengers traveling as tourists are not allowed to enter. Those traveling on business or duty must spend 14 days in quarantine upon arrival.  From May 1, 2020, Chinese nationals traveling to South Korea for business purposes may qualify for special "fast-track" immigration clearance provided they hold proof of a negative test for COVID-19 performed no more than 72 hours prior to departure. They must again test negative for COVID-19 upon arrival in Korea before being exempted from the mandatory quarantine procedures described below. Persons using "fast-track" immigration clearance are subject to standard government surveillance measures in place to combat COVID-19.

"Special immigration procedures" are in place for all persons arriving in South Korea regardless of origin. Individuals are allowed entry only after they provide verifiable contact information and an address within South Korea valid for the duration of their stay. All persons are required to install either the "Self-quarantine Safety Protection App" or the "Mobile Self-diagnosis App" on their phones and follow the instructions for documenting their health condition on a daily basis for 14 days.
 
Special Immigration Procedures
From April 13, 2020, all persons arriving from the United States (including Korean nationals) must self-isolate and must get diagnostic tests within three days of commencing their quarantine period.
 
Symptomatic Passengers
All persons (including Korean nationals) will go through diagnostic tests if they have fever or respiratory symptoms identified during the quarantine stage. Persons who test positive for COVID-19 will be transferred to a hospital or Living and Treatment Center (Community Treatment Center). Korean nationals or long-term foreign nationals who test negative will be placed under self-quarantine. Foreign nationals who are short-term will be placed under quarantine at designated facilities.
 
Asymptomatic Passengers
Asymptomatic Korean nationals arriving from Europe and the United States will go into self-quarantine and get diagnostic tests at a health center within three days of arrival. Asymptomatic Korean nationals arriving from countries outside the European countries and the United States will go into self-quarantine and get diagnostic tests if they display any symptoms.
 
Asymptomatic foreign nationals for long-term and short-term stay arriving from Europe will get diagnostic tests at the airport. Afterwards, long-term foreign nationals will go into self-quarantine while short-term foreign nationals will be quarantined at designated facilities.
 
Asymptomatic long-term foreign nationals arriving from the United States will be placed under self-quarantine and must get diagnostic tests within three days at a public health clinic.
 
Asymptomatic long-term stay foreign nationals arriving from countries other than European countries and the United States will go into self-quarantine and get diagnostic tests if they display any symptoms. Asymptomatic short-term arriving from countries outside the European continent will be placed under quarantine at designated facilities and get diagnostic tests if they display any symptoms.
 
From March 19, 2020, foreign nationals arriving from Hubei Province in China are prohibited from entering. Enhanced screening and quarantine measures are in place for persons arriving from Mainland China, Hong Kong SAR, Iran, Italy, and Macau SAR.

Kyrgyzstan: Flights to Kyrgyzstan are suspended. From March 19, Kyrgyzstan will ban entry of citizens of foreign states and stateless persons into Kyrgyzstan. The exception is drivers engaged in international freight transport, crews and flight personnel of aircraft, train and locomotive teams of international railway traffic. The ban also does not apply to accredited employees of diplomatic missions and consular offices of foreign states, as well as accredited employees of international organizations and family members of these persons in case of informing in advance about their arrival through the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Foreign citizens and stateless persons, who are members of the families of Kyrgyzstanis with documentary evidence of close family ties, or have a permanent residence permit in the Kyrgyz Republic, will be able to enter.
 
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs will suspend issuance of entry visas of all categories to foreign citizens and stateless persons for the period of the ban. The entry ban for foreigners will remain in effect until the government decree is canceled.

Lao PDR: Laos has suspended all flights until at least June 30. Medevac, humanitarian, relief, diplomat and repatriation flights with an entry permit obtained from the Laos Ministry of Foreign Affairs may still enter the country. Technical stops where passengers and airline crew do not disembark are also still permitted to enter. All entrants must provide a negative PCR test issued at most 72 hours before departure. They must also complete a health declaration form on arrival, and will be subject to medical screening and a 14-day self-quarantine requirement at their own expense.
 
Macao: Macao has restricted the entry of all non-Macau residents from anywhere except Hong Kong, Taiwan, or mainland China.
 
Malaysia: Under the travel restrictions announced on March 16 and extended several times, all foreign nationals, with very limited exceptions, are restricted from entry to Malaysia until August 31, though this end date may be further extended at the discretion of the Malaysian government. 

This policy does not apply to permanent residents holding a "MyPR" card, spouses and children of Malaysian nationals, or diplomats. From June 1, 2020, all persons (including Malaysian nationals) returning from abroad are required to undergo a health check and a 14-day quarantine. 
 
Non-nationals must agree to pay the full cost of MYR150 per day for the duration of their quarantine. Malaysian nationals are responsible for half that amount. All persons seeking to return to Malaysia must download and sign a Letter of Undertaking (LoU). Letters are available from the Malaysian Ministry of Foreign Affairs website. At least three days prior to departure, all persons must submit the relevant documents (including the LoU) via email to a Malaysian embassy or consulate for approval. Failure to submit these documents will complicate the process of entry into Malaysia and/or result in a denial of permission to board flights bound for Malaysia. 

Mongolia: Mongolia has restricted entry to all travelers except for citizens or residents who are direct family members of a citizen. They will be subject to a 21-day quarantine at a designated facility upon arrival, followed by a 14-day period of self-isolation at home. Accredited staff of diplomatic missions and offices of international organizations in Mongolia and their direct family members may still enter the country. They will be subject to a 21-day quarantine at a designated facility upon arrival, followed by a 14-day period of self-isolation at home. International freight transport drivers and railway train personnel of Mongolia, Russia and China may also enter the country.From March 22 until June  30, 2020, foreign nationals will be banned from entry. All commercial flights, passenger rail, and auto traffic into and out of Mongolia are suspended during this time period.
 
Myanmar: From April 11, 2020, all international commercial flights are suspended, and all land border checkpoints are closed. All persons (including Myanmar nationals) arriving from abroad must undergo a 21-day quarantine at a designated facility followed by 7 days of self-isolation at home. The Myanmar government has suspended the issuing of visas to foreign nationals. This policy does not apply to accredited diplomats, United Nations officials, and crews of ships or aircraft traveling to and from Myanmar. All existing visa-free and visa-on-arrival arrangements are suspended.

From March 21, 2020, all persons (including Myanmar nationals) having visited any of the following countries within 14 days of their arrival in Myanmar are required to present a valid medical certificate (issued by a recognized health authority in their country of departure) stating they show no symptoms of acute respiratory illness such as fever, cough, or shortness of breath prior to departing for Myanmar: Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Iran, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and United States. Foreign nationals who have traveled to areas in South Korea or China with known COVID-19 outbreaks within 14 days of their arrival in Myanmar are prohibited from entering.
 
Nepal: Nepal has suspended all international flights until at least July 5, 2020. Evacuation, rescue, and emergency flights, and flights with special permission from the Civil Aviation Authority may still enter the country.
 
Pakistan: Pakistan is now accepting flights at all international airports except Gwadar and Turbat. Pakistan has opened its airports to international flights, with the exceptions of Gwadar (GWD) and Turbat (TUK). Travelers will be subject to thermal screening on arrival, and will be quarantined either in a free facility arranged by the Government of Pakistan, or in a facility which the passenger will pay for. Airlines are responsible for recording which facility passengers prefer. Travelers will be tested for COVID-19 and either remain in government quarantine or told to self-isolate depending on test results.

Philippines: The Philippines declared a health emergency due to the local transmission of coronavirus (COVID-19).

From 3 May, all international flights are suspended until 1 July 2020. All sea and land borders are closed to foreign travelers. Filipino nationals and residents returning from abroad must quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. Face masks are also recommended inside the airport.

Stay-at-home orders and a closure of non-essential businesses are part of the lockdown measures and will remain in place for areas that are high-risk. Lower risk areas will be placed under a less strict quarantine.
 
Russia: Russia has restricted the entry of all travelers who are not Russian nationals, permanent residents, residents with residence permits, airline crew members, diplomats, and travelers whose visit concerns the death of a direct relative.

The Russian Government has issued a grace period on visas, residence permits, and other documents that expire between March 15, 2020 to June 15, 2020. Individuals whose documents expire during this period may exit Russia, before the end of the period (June 15, 2020), without formally extending their term of stay or applying for new documents.
 
Singapore: From June 8, 2020, Chinese nationals traveling to Singapore for business purposes may qualify for special "fast lane" immigration clearance. To use "fast lane," travelers must be sponsored by either a company or a Singapore Government agency, which will file an application on behalf of the traveler for a "SafeTravel Pass." If approved, the traveler will receive an official notification letter. Persons requiring a visa may use the letter during the visa application process. Persons already holding a valid visa may use the existing visa as normal. Persons who qualify under a visa-free arrangement need not apply for a visa to use the "fast lane."

For at least 7 days prior to departure for Singapore, "fast lane" travelers must remain in one of the following provinces or municipalities in China: Chongqing, Guangdong, Jiangsu, Shanghai, Tianjin, or Zhejiang. No more than 48 hours prior to departure, "fast lane" travelers must undergo a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for COVID-19. Airlines will conduct pre-boarding checks to verify the traveler holds a valid SafeTravel Pass, a negative PCR test result, a return air ticket, and a valid visa (if required). Failure to produce these documents may result in a denial of permission to board the aircraft.
 
Upon arrival, "fast lane" travelers will undergo an additional PCR test and will be transported by the host company or government agency to a non-residential accommodation where they must self-isolate while awaiting their test results. Upon confirmation of a negative test result, the host company or government agency will ensure the traveler is transported to and from their workplace for the duration of the traveler's stay in Singapore. The host company or government agency will further ensure the traveler installs and uses the "TraceTogether" mobile app for the duration of the traveler's stay in Singapore. "Fast lane" travelers are not permitted to use public transportation while in Singapore.
 
All Others
From June 17, 2020, the following policies are in place:
1) All short-term visitors, regardless of origin, are prohibited from entering or transiting through Singapore;
2) All persons (including Singapore nationals and permanent residents) must submit a health declaration to immigration authorities upon arrival;
3) All persons (including Singapore nationals, permanent residents, and Long-Term Pass holders) must undergo a 14-day quarantine at their own expense. Singapore nationals and persons who, for the 14 days prior to their departure for Singapore, have remained in one of the following countries / regions may quarantine at their homes or other suitable accommodation: Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Hong Kong SAR, Japan, Macao SAR, Mainland China, New Zealand, South Korea, Taiwan, and Vietnam. All other persons must quarantine in a designated facility;
4) All persons (including Singapore nationals) must, at their own expense, undergo testing for COVID-19 at the completion of their 14-day quarantine period;
5) All foreign nationals holding a Long-Term Pass issued by Immigration & Checkpoints Authority (ICA) must obtain prior permission from the relevant government agency prior to departing for Singapore. This includes Long-Term Visit Pass (LTVP) or Student's Pass (STP), or In-Principle Approval (IPA) letters for LTVP or STP.

Sri Lanka: Foreign nationals are prohibited from entering Sri Lanka. Beginning August 1, 2020, international flights are scheduled to resume arriving at Colombo International Airport (CMB), Ratmalana International Airport (RML), and Mattala Rajapaksa International Airport (HRI). 

All foreign nationals will require a valid visa, which they may apply for online. Visas will carry an initial validity of 30 days and have the option for a 6-month extenshion to be granted following arrival. Online visa applications may be found at: www.eta.gov.lk/slvisa/ . 
 
In order to board flights bound for Sri Lanka, all persons must prove they have tested negative for COVID-19 no more than 72 hours prior to departure using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. All passenger cruise ships are prohibited from docking at Sir Lankan ports.

Taiwan: On June 15th, Taiwan announced its fourth 30-day extension on international travel. Taiwan has restricted entry of all travelers who are not Republic of China Taiwan passport holders, Alien Resident Certificate holders, “SPECIAL ENTRY PERMIT FOR COVID-19 OUTBREAK” visa holders, or diplomats. All travelers must observe a 14-day home quarantine upon arrival. Taiwan has restricted all travelers from transiting the country.
 
Tajikistan: From April 8, 2020, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering or exiting Tajikistan. This policy does not apply to diplomats and representatives of international organizations or financial institutions accredited in Tajikistan, or their family members.

Persons granted entry to Tajikistan must self-isolate for 14 days under supervision of staff from the Ministry of Health and Social Protection.
 
Thailand: On May 26, the Royal Thai Government (RTG) decided to extend the national state of emergency until June 30, 2020, to prevent a second wave of COVID-19 infections in Thailand.  The ban on incoming international flights remains in effect also. The RTG continues to discuss the further easing of lockdown measures.

On May 28, the Royal Thai Government (RTG) announced that non-Thai nationals who either possess a valid work permit or have already been granted permission from a Thai government agency to work in the Kingdom can apply for permission to enter the Kingdom. The official announcement states that only those in urgent need to enter the Kingdom may submit an application for entry and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in consultation with the Board of Investment and the Ministry of Labor will consider requests on a case-by-case basis. 
 
All arriving travelers will be subject to quarantine for 14 days. The validity of all temporary visas has been extended until July 31, 2020.

Timor-Leste: Timor-Leste has restricted the entry of all travelers who have visited or transited through China, South Korea, Italy, or Iran in the previous four weeks.
 
Turkmenistan: Turkmenistan has suspended all flights into the country until at least June 20, 2020. Repatriation flights of Turkmenistan nationals and residents may still enter the country.

Travelers are required to have a health report issued within 24 hours of departure from the health organizations of the country they are arriving from that shows that they have undergone the coronavirus (COVID-19) check and tested negative.
 
Uzbekistan: Uzbekistan has resumed international flights for certain categories of travelers from countries deemed to have a stable epidemiological situation. The complete list of countries includes the EU, Japan, South Korea, China, Israel, Malaysia, Thailand, Singapore, the United Arab Emirates, Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan, Russia and CIS countries (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, and Tajikistan).

Travelers who have spent at least 14 days before travel in the countries listed above may enter/exit Uzbekistan if they are: Employees of embassies and consulates and members of their families, staff of foreign companies and other organizations working in Uzbekistan as part of investment projects, people traveling for medical treatment, people with close relatives or seriously ill relatives abroad, people transiting through Uzbekistan at the request of embassies and consulates of foreign countries, foreign citizens with residence in Uzbekistan, stateless persons, or citizens of Uzbekistan with registration in other countries.
 
Quarantine rules apply differently depending on which country the traveler is arriving from:
Japan, South Korea, China and Israel: No quarantine required. 
European Union, Malaysia, Thailand and Singapore: 14-day self-quarantine at home. 
United Arab Emirates, Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan, Russia and CIS countries (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan): Government quarantine
 
All travelers entering Uzbekistan must wear masks in public at all times.

Vietnam: From March 22, 2020, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering Vietnam. This policy does not apply to diplomats and persons traveling for official or particular purposes such as participants in crucial international events, foreign experts, business managers, high-skilled workers, etc. All persons (including Vietnamese nationals) entering Vietnam must undergo examination for COVID-19 and quarantine at a designated facility. This policy does not apply to diplomats, persons traveling for official purposes, and Vietnamese nationals holding diplomatic or official passports. The Vietnamese government has suspended visa-free arrangements pertaining to Vietnamese nationals residing overseas and their family members.

From July 1, 2020, the Vietnamese government will offer e-visa service to persons holding a passport from one of the following countries or regions: Argentina, Andorra, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong SAR, Hungary, Iceland, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macao SAR, Macedonia, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Micronesia, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Myanmar, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palau, Panama, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Samoa, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Timor-Leste, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela.

Central America - Caribbean
Antigua And Barb.: Antigua and Barbuda has now reopened its borders. Upon arrival, all travelers must wear masks and must go through medical screening, present a completed health declaration form, and have a medical certificate stating a negative coronavirus (COVID-19) test result issued within 48 hours before arrival. Travelers without a valid medical certificate will be quarantined for 14 days or until they test negative for coronavirus.

Flights to Antigua and Barbuda will be resuming starting on June 1. Upon arrival, all travelers must wear masks and must go through medical screening, present a completed health declaration form, and have a medical certificate stating a negative coronavirus (COVID-19) test result issued within 48 hours before arrival. Travelers without a valid medical certificate will be quarantined for 14 days or until they test negative for coronavirus.
 
Bahamas: International commercial flights are suspended until 1 July. Any returning residents must quarantine for 14 days upon arrival.
 
From 15 June, private flights and vessels are allowed to enter the country, however these visitors must present a negative PCR test of no older than ten days.
 
A state of emergency is in place until 29 June, including a daily 9pm to 5am curfew. The strict 24/7 curfew was lifted on 2 June, and there is no longer a total lockdown on weekends.
 
Barbados: A mandatory 14-day quarantine in a Government facility for all persons entering Barbados. Anyone arriving with a travel history from China, Iran, and South Korea are also subjected to a fourteen (14) day quarantine. Citizens and residents of Barbados will be subject to a home-quarantine. The Government of Barbados is conducting thermal screening at airports and seaports.
 
Belize: From March 21, land border with Mexico has been closed, tentatively for 30 days, except for cargo. From March 23, Belize's main airport has ceased operations.
 
Costa Rica: From March 18 to June 30. 2020, all borders are closed, and foreign nationals will be denied entry. The country will gradually reopen the economy from May 16 to August 2, 2020
 
Cuba: Cuba has suspended all flights into the country until July 1, except for humanitarian aid flights. Charter flights to Cayo Coco (CCC), Cayo Largo del Sur (CYO) and Santa Clara (SNU) are expected to restart from July 1.
 
Travelers on these flights will be tested on arrival (a ‘PCR’ swab and a temperature test) and will be transferred directly to their resorts. Anyone that has a positive test result will be transferred to a hospital. Other flights are not expecting to restart until at least July 31.
 
Dominica: Dominica has suspended all non-repatriation flights. Returning citizens will be placed under a 14-day quarantine. Airline crew is not allowed to disembark.
 
Dominican Republic: From March 19, 2020, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering the Dominican Republic. All border checkpoints are closed. This policy does not apply to the transportation of cargo. A nationwide state of emergency is in effect until at least July 1, 2020.
 
El Salvador: El Salvador shut down its airport on March 16 to all commercial flights. On March 11, it had banned entry to all foreigners, excluding accredited diplomats and legal residents of the country. Those allowed to enter were subject to a possible 30-day quarantine. Local authorities have announced that commercial flights will resume on August 6, 2020.
 
Grenada: Grenada has closed Maurice Bishop International Airport (GND) and Lauriston Airport (CRU) to all passenger traffic. Grenada citizens and residents may still enter the country, but those who have visited the above countries in the last 14 days will be subject to a 14-day quarantine.
 
Guatemala: Airports in Guatemala are closed until 15 August 2020. - This does not apply to humanitarian, military or ambulance flights.Passengers are subject to quarantine for 7 days. From March 17, 2020, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering Guatemala.
 
Haiti: Haiti's government declared a state of emergency over the coronavirus outbreak, closing the borders of the nation and imposing a curfew after authorities detected the first two cases of infection.

It has also suspended all international flights, except for those coming from the US, and it closed its border with the Dominican Republic
 
Honduras: Honduras has closed its airports to all flights until at least August 15, with the exception of humanitarian flights with an authorization issued 24 hours before departure by the Honduran Secretariat of tourism or Secretariat for foreign relations and international cooperation. all borders closed except for cargo.
 
Jamaica: From June 15, 2020, all persons (including Jamaican nationals) must present a "Travel Authorization" document prior to boarding flights bound for Jamaica. Jamaica has imposed travel restrictions on travellers from Iran, China, South Korea, Italy, Singapore, Germany, Spain, France and the UK, local media reported. The government also said anyone arriving from countries where there is community spread will be required to self-quarantine for 14 days.
 
Mexico: A completed "Cuestionario de indentificacion de factores de riesgo en viajeros" must be presented to "immigration" upon arrival. The form can be found at https://afac.hostingerapp.com/ 
 
Tourists can travel to select Mexico beaches by plane. The state of Quintana Roo (Cancun) is greeting tourists in limited numbers. Los Cabos is open with limited occupancy. Mexico has granted beach cities as essential travel. 
 
The United States and Mexico entered a joint initiative March 21 restricting non-essential travel along the U.S.-Mexico land border to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 virus.  Non-essential travel includes travel that is considered tourism or recreational in nature.  The restrictions are in place until at least July 21.
 
Travelers entering Mexico by land from the United States may be denied admission if the purpose of their visit is considered non-essential.  Travelers should carry evidence of the essential nature of their visit and evidence of their resident status in Mexico, if applicable.
 
Panama: Panama has suspended all flights into the country except humanitarian flights until at least July 22. Foreign nationals are prohibited from entering Paraguay. All land border checkpoints are closed and all international flights are suspended until further notice. Any persons granted entry to Paraguay must self-isolate for 14 days.
 
Puerto Rico: On April 6, Puerto Rico announced passengers will be quarantined for 14 days, and they must present a completed Puerto Rico Department of Health form upon arrival.

Europe
Albania: Albania’s government resumed international flights from “Mother Teresa Airport”, in Tirana to the EU and Schengen Area Member States. Eligible to enter remain only the Schengen Area and European Union citizens and persons who have residence permits of the Member States.

Albania has increased the number of medical personnel at all ports of entries. Enhanced screening and quarantine measures are being implemented. Travelers should be prepared for travel restrictions to be put into effect with little or no advance notice. There is no general requirement for travelers returning to Albania to self-quarantine. Quarantine will only apply in specific cases when ordered by health authorities. Depending of your country of origin, travel restrictions and quarantine requirement may apply.
 
Andorra: Please see Coronavirus (COVID-19) regulations for France or Spain, whichever is transited to enter Andorra.
 
Austria: As of July 1, the European Union opened its borders to nonessential travelers from countries where COVID-19 is deemed under control. The list of countries includes Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, Andorra, Vatican, San Marino and Monaco. Chinese residents will be allowed to enter if the government confirms reciprocity.
While the travel ban is not legally bonding, member countries and non-E.U. nations such as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein are strongly encouraged to implement it. Residents of other countries are barred from traveling to the EU area except for those who are EU citizens or long-term residents and their respective family members. The list of countries will be reviewed every two weeks.

Update 29 June: Due to a high number of cases, travelers from the Gutersloh district in Germany will need a negative COVID-19 test (administered in the last 48 hours) to travel to Austria.

On July 1, Austria issued travel warnings for the whole of the Western Balkans, as several Balkan states are seeing a spike in cases. Austria's highest travel warning is now in place for Bosnia-Herzegovina, North Macedonia, Albania and Kosovo. The category-six warning affects all travel to the Western Balkans and recommends that Austrians return from the countries involved immediately. Those coming back will either face a 14-day quarantine or must show proof of a negative Covid-19 test. The UK, Portugal, Sweden and Turkey are also subject to Austria's highest warning level in Europe.
 
Belarus: Belarus has not implemented any entry restrictions, but foreign citizens arriving in Belarus are subject to a 14-day self-quarantine requirement. This requirement may be waived for travelers carrying a medical certificate, issued within 48 hours of arrival, indicating a negative COVID-19 test result.
 
Belgium: As of July 1, the European Union opened its borders to nonessential travelers from countries where COVID-19 is deemed under control. The list of countries includes Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, Andorra, Vatican, San Marino and Monaco. Chinese residents will be allowed to enter if the government confirms reciprocity.
While the travel ban is not legally bonding, member countries and non-E.U. nations such as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein are strongly encouraged to implement it. Residents of other countries are barred from traveling to the EU area except for those who are EU citizens or long-term residents and their respective family members. The list of countries will be reviewed every two weeks.
 
Bosnia And Herzegovina: Sarajevo airport has reopened to passenger traffic. As airlines resume flights, changes and cancellations may occur. Check with individual carriers for more information.

Bosnia And Herzegovina has closed its borders to all non-European Union residents. Currently, only BiH citizens and residents, and citizens of Croatia, Serbia, and Montenegro may enter the country.

There is still an entry ban for most non-resident foreign nationals, though some with special circumstances (e.g. For a business meeting, to a funeral, for medical treatment, or in the company of a BiH-citizen spouse) may enter. Special documentation and/or a negative COVID test may be required.
 
Bulgaria: As of July 1, the European Union opened its borders to nonessential travelers from countries where COVID-19 is deemed under control. The list of countries includes Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, Andorra, Vatican, San Marino and Monaco. Chinese residents will be allowed to enter if the government confirms reciprocity.
While the travel ban is not legally bonding, member countries and non-E.U. nations such as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein are strongly encouraged to implement it. Residents of other countries are barred from traveling to the EU area except for those who are EU citizens or long-term residents and their respective family members. The list of countries will be reviewed every two weeks.

Bulgaria has restricted the entry of all travelers who are not nationals of Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the Vatican City, or the United Kingdom. Bulgarian nationals, permanent residents, and long-term residence permit holders may also enter the country. However, travelers arriving from all countries except for Austria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Montenegro, Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia or Spain subject to a quarantine of 14 days. Nationals of Turkey, Serbia, and Montenegro may also transit through Bulgaria to return to their countries of residence. Bulgarian passports and national ID cards which have expired on or after March 13, 2020 will be considered valid with a prolongation of 6 months. There are currently 1,606 active cases of COVID-19 diagnosed in Bulgaria and 207 deaths as of Jun 23, 2020
 
Croatia: As of July 1, the European Union opened its borders to nonessential travelers from countries where COVID-19 is deemed under control. The list of countries includes Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, Andorra, Vatican, San Marino and Monaco. Chinese residents will be allowed to enter if the government confirms reciprocity.
While the travel ban is not legally bonding, member countries and non-E.U. nations such as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein are strongly encouraged to implement it. Residents of other countries are barred from traveling to the EU area except for those who are EU citizens or long-term residents and their respective family members. The list of countries will be reviewed every two weeks.

Croatia has opened its borders to visitors from the EU/EEA and the UK, provided they hold an accommodation reservation or residence permit in the country.

The Croatian government has introduced a new online entry form to expedite the entry of foreign visitors. Visitors should carry a copy of their accommodation booking or proof of ownership of vacation homes/boats when arriving in Croatia. Business travelers should carry evidence of a business invitation or meetings.
 
Cyprus: As of July 1, the European Union opened its borders to nonessential travelers from countries where COVID-19 is deemed under control. The list of countries includes Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, Andorra, Vatican, San Marino and Monaco. Chinese residents will be allowed to enter if the government confirms reciprocity.
While the travel ban is not legally bonding, member countries and non-E.U. nations such as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein are strongly encouraged to implement it. Residents of other countries are barred from traveling to the EU area except for those who are EU citizens or long-term residents and their respective family members. The list of countries will be reviewed every two weeks.

As of June 9, flights to Cyprus have resumed. However, the only travelers who will be granted entry will be Cypriot nationals and residents, travelers arriving from Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jordan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, South Korea, Switzerland, or the United Arab Emirates, and travelers with special permission from the government of Cyprus. Travelers who have been in countries other than the above-listed destinations within the last 14 days will not be allowed to enter Cyprus, even via a third country (e.g.: Greece), until further notice.

Travelers arriving from the above-named list of countries will need a medical certificate stating a negative COVID-19 test result issued within 72 hours of their arrival. Nationals and residents of Cyprus will also be tested for Coronavirus upon arrival. Cyprus nationals and residents who are not arriving from the countries named above will be required to self-isolate for 14 days upon their arrival. The administration in the north of Cyprus is now also allowing entry to ‘citizens’ and foreign nationals who hold residency, work or student permits. Travelers in one of these categories who arrive before July 1 will have to go into 14 days quarantine in facilities controlled by the administration, the cost of which is payable by the individual concerned.

From July 1, travelers may enter by presenting a negative PCR test result (taken in the previous 72 hours) but will have to go into quarantine for 14 days in facilities controlled by the administration, at their own cost.
 
Czech Republic: As of July 1, the European Union opened its borders to nonessential travelers from countries where COVID-19 is deemed under control. The list of countries includes Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, Andorra, Vatican, San Marino and Monaco. Chinese residents will be allowed to enter if the government confirms reciprocity. While the travel ban is not legally bonding, member countries and non-E.U. nations such as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein are strongly encouraged to implement it. Residents of other countries are barred from traveling to the EU area except for those who are EU citizens or long-term residents and their respective family members. The list of countries will be reviewed every two weeks.

The Czech Republic does not apply any restrictions on exiting the country. As entry is concerned, non-essential travel is not recommended, however the introduced restrictions are now being gradually eased and lifted. Free movement has been restored with the majority of EU+ Member States. People coming from countries with a low risk of infection can travel in the Czech Republic without restrictions. People from countries with a medium and high risk of infection must enter quarantine or prove themselves with a negative COVID 19 test.
 
Denmark: As of June 26, Denmark’s government has decided to welcome tourist from the majority of the European Union countries, as a part of a series of facilitated moves amid an improved situation related to the Coronavirus situation in the country and further in the EU.

Exempt will be only the citizens of Ireland, Malta, Portugal, Romania, the UK and Sweden (except the region of Västerbotten), where the Danish authorities assert the epidemiological situation is not exactly under control.

Under the country’s new guidelines, Danish residents who wish to travel to these six countries are only recommended to do so if it is “strictly necessary”, while tourists from these countries will be barred from entering Denmark
 
Estonia: Travelers must come from countries with less than 25 COVID cases per 100 000 persons in last 14 days. From 01/06, Estonia admits people with no Covid-19 symptoms arriving from the European Union, the members of the Schengen area or the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland, but quarantine requirements may apply. The compulsory quarantine for people arriving in Estonia depends on whether the coronavirus infection rate in the country of departure - where they have spent at least 14 days before departure - is above 15 per 100 000 inhabitants. Anyone arriving in Estonia from a country with a higher infection rate must self-isolate for two weeks on arrival.
 
Finland: The Finnish Government agreed that as of 13 July, it would lift the internal border control and restrictions on traffic between Finland and countries where the incidence of COVID-19 is similar to that in countries where internal border control has already been lifted. These countries are Norway, Denmark, Iceland and the Baltic countries. At present, the limit value is a maximum of eight new cases of the disease per 100,000 persons in the previous 14 days. The Government will update the new list countries based on the development of the epidemic by 10 July.

Based on the current development of the epidemic, internal border control could be lifted for the following Schengen countries as of 13 July: Germany, Italy, Austria, Greece, Switzerland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Hungary and Liechtenstein. In addition, travel to Finland from Croatia, Cyprus and Ireland, which are EU Member States but not part of the Schengen area, would be allowed.

Work-related, essential travel (for example a family reason, a personal reason or travel to a property, private residence or holiday residence in Finland or the purchase of one) and return traffic is possible from EU and Schengen countries as well as the UK. However currently travelers entering Finland from all but Norway, Denmark, Iceland and the Baltic countries are recommended to self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival. Entry restrictions (excluding transit) to Finland for travelers from countries outside the EU remain in place until at least until 14 July.
 
France: As of July 1, the European Union opened its borders to nonessential travelers from countries where COVID-19 is deemed under control. The list of countries includes Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, Andorra, Vatican, San Marino and Monaco. Chinese residents will be allowed to enter if the government confirms reciprocity.
While the travel ban is not legally bonding, member countries and non-E.U. nations such as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein are strongly encouraged to implement it. Residents of other countries are barred from traveling to the EU area except for those who are EU citizens or long-term residents and their respective family members. The list of countries will be reviewed every two weeks.

France has yet to confirm whether it will comply to the E.U. recommendations. Travel to France is possible without any restriction from countries in the European zone (EU Member States, Andorra, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Monaco, Norway, San Marino, Switzerland and the Vatican). Reciprocal quarantine measures remain in force if you are arriving from the United Kingdom. Travel to France from outside the European zone remains restricted. You may be asked to respect a quarantine period on arrival.
 
Georgia: Georgia will reopen its borders starting from July 1. Georgia has restricted the entry of all travelers who are not nationals and residents of Georgia, or an immediate family member. Airline crew, humanitarian aid workers, diplomats and their families, travelers with refugee status in Georgia, and travelers with stateless status may still enter the country. Residence permit holders must obtain an OK TO BOARD before departing for Georgia. All travelers entering Georgia are subject to a 14-day quarantine upon arrival. International commercial flights to Georgia are expected to resume starting from July 1.
 
Germany: As of July 1, the European Union opened its borders to nonessential travelers from countries where COVID-19 is deemed under control. The list of countries includes Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, Andorra, Vatican, San Marino and Monaco. Chinese residents will be allowed to enter if the government confirms reciprocity. While the travel ban is not legally bonding, member countries and non-E.U. nations such as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein are strongly encouraged to implement it. Residents of other countries are barred from traveling to the EU area except for those who are EU citizens or long-term residents and their respective family members. The list of countries will be reviewed every two weeks.

On July 2, Germany announced it will open its borders to 11 countries, leaving out 4 of the countries listed by the European Union Commission (Algeria, Morocco, Rwanda and Serbia).
 
Greece: As of July 1, the European Union opened its borders to nonessential travelers from countries where COVID-19 is deemed under control. The list of countries includes Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, Andorra, Vatican, San Marino and Monaco. Chinese residents will be allowed to enter if the government confirms reciprocity. While the travel ban is not legally bonding, member countries and non-E.U. nations such as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein are strongly encouraged to implement it. Residents of other countries are barred from traveling to the EU area except for those who are EU citizens or long-term residents and their respective family members. The list of countries will be reviewed every two weeks.

As of the 1st July international arrivals and departures are allowed into all ports, airports and some land borders in Greece, for all EU Member States, Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican City. All visitors are obliged to submit the Passenger Locator Form (PLF) which is available online, up to 48 hours before travelling. The visitors will receive a QR code which will be scanned upon arrival. QR code screening personnel direct passengers, depending on their QR code, either to the Covid-19 testing area or the exit. Visitors subjected into testing are obliged to self-isolate at the address of their final destination as declared on their passenger locator form (PLF) for 24 hours until the testing outcome. In case they are tested positive to Covid-19, they will have to stay isolated for 14 days to the dedicated quarantine hotels across the country.

Travelers from the UK and Sweden are still prohibited from entering Greece until July 15.
 
Hungary: Hungary will not comply with a European Union request to add non-EU countries to a “safe” travel list, except for Serbia, Prime Minister Viktor Organ said.

As of 18 June, EU and EEA citizens, as well as Hungarians returning from these countries, may enter Hungary without restrictions. Citizens of the European Union as well as Liechtenstein, Switzerland, Norway, and Iceland are allowed to freely enter Hungary, without restrictions, and Hungarian citizens returning from the countries of the EU or the European Economic Area do not have to enter quarantine after crossing the Hungarian border either. This does not apply to the United Kingdom; UK citizens may only enter Hungary with separate permission, and subject to individual assessment may be obliged to enter quarantine for two weeks, while Hungarian citizens returning from the UK are allowed to enter Hungary without any restriction.
 
Iceland: As of July 1, the European Union opened its borders to nonessential travelers from countries where COVID-19 is deemed under control. The list of countries includes Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, Andorra, Vatican, San Marino and Monaco. Chinese residents will be allowed to enter if the government confirms reciprocity. While the travel ban is not legally bonding, member countries and non-E.U. nations such as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein are strongly encouraged to implement it. Residents of other countries are barred from traveling to the EU area except for those who are EU citizens or long-term residents and their respective family members. The list of countries will be reviewed every two weeks.

Iceland announced it will comply with the European Union Council as of July 1.

Since June 15, all arriving passengers must choose to either 1) get tested at the airport or, 2) quarantine for 14 days. Beginning July 1, 2020, all persons who choose to undergo a test for COVID-19 will pay for the test at a cost of ISK 11,000 if paid at the airport or ISK 9,000 if paid in advance. This policy does not apply to persons born in 2005 or thereafter.
 
Ireland: Ireland, not a part of the Schengen Area, is not subject to the July 1 recommendation from the European Commission and is set to continue with its own set of travel restrictions.

While there is no official travel ban to go to Ireland, the Irish Health authorities require anyone entering Ireland from abroad, except Northern Ireland, to either self-quarantine on arrival for 14 days. Passengers arriving from overseas must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form indicating where they will self-isolate. This policy does not apply to diplomats or persons engaged in the transportation of passengers of freight. Failure to submit the firm is considered an offense. Forms are available from the following web address: https://www.gov.ie/en/publication/e885b2-covid-19-coronavirus-travel-advice/
 
Italy: Italy announced it will keep its travel ban in place for non-E.U. member nations. Within hours of the EU's announcement, Italian authorities said the country would opt out of the plan, and would be keeping quarantine rules in place for travelers coming from outside the bloc.

Effective from June 3, 2020, travelers arriving from Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland or the United Kingdom will be allowed to enter Italy.
 
Kosovo: The airport in Pristina is expected to open on June 28, 2020. Travelers are recommended to have a negative COVID-19 test within 4 days of arrival. The COVID-19 test is not required for departing passengers.

Contact Airprishtina, Turkish Airlines, Alta Via Travel (info@altaviatravel.com) or your travel agency to inquire about upcoming flights.

Additionally, it is possible that neighboring airports in Serbia and/or Albania have opened and are scheduling commercial flights, check with those airports directly or the respective Facebook pages for Belgrade and Tirana for updates.

Currently there are no mandatory country wide curfews in place within Kosovo.

All land borders into and out of Kosovo are open. If departing Kosovo overland, please check with the country you will be traveling to verify entry requirements and if there are quarantine restrictions.
 
Latvia: As of July 1, the European Union opened its borders to nonessential travelers from countries where COVID-19 is deemed under control. The list of countries includes Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, Andorra, Vatican, San Marino and Monaco. Chinese residents will be allowed to enter if the government confirms reciprocity. While the travel ban is not legally bonding, member countries and non-E.U. nations such as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein are strongly encouraged to implement it. Residents of other countries are barred from traveling to the EU area except for those who are EU citizens or long-term residents and their respective family members. The list of countries will be reviewed every two weeks.

Citizens of the European Union, the European Economic Area and Switzerland, as well as people who are permanently residing in those countries, when travelling from their home countries to Latvia are no longer obligated to go into a 14-day self-isolation period, so long as their home countries have maintained an incidence of 15 individuals in 100,000 who have fallen ill with COVID-19.
 
Liechtenstein: Please refer to Switzerland's travel restrictions.
 
Lithuania: As of July 1, the European Union opened its borders to nonessential travelers from countries where COVID-19 is deemed under control. The list of countries includes Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, Andorra, Vatican, San Marino and Monaco. Chinese residents will be allowed to enter if the government confirms reciprocity. While the travel ban is not legally bonding, member countries and non-E.U. nations such as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein are strongly encouraged to implement it. Residents of other countries are barred from traveling to the EU area except for those who are EU citizens or long-term residents and their respective family members. The list of countries will be reviewed every two weeks.

Citizens of the European Union, the European Economic Area and Switzerland, as well as people who are permanently residing in those countries, when travelling from their home countries to Latvia are no longer obligated to go into a 14-day self-isolation period, so long as their home countries have maintained an incidence of 15 individuals in 100,000 who have fallen ill with COVID-19.
 
Luxembourg: As of July 1, the European Union opened its borders to nonessential travelers from countries where COVID-19 is deemed under control. The list of countries includes Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, Andorra, Vatican, San Marino and Monaco. Chinese residents will be allowed to enter if the government confirms reciprocity. While the travel ban is not legally bonding, member countries and non-E.U. nations such as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein are strongly encouraged to implement it. Residents of other countries are barred from traveling to the EU area except for those who are EU citizens or long-term residents and their respective family members. The list of countries will be reviewed every two weeks.

Luxembourg has restricted the entry of all travelers who are not Luxembourg nationals, and their family members who are returning home. Nationals and residents of the European Union, Schengen Member States, and the Schengen Associated States, the United Kingdom, and their family members who are returning home may still enter the country, along with healthcare professionals, border workers, diplomats, humanitarian aid workers, military personnel, travelers in family emergencies, and travelers on their way to their home countries by land who have proof of their onward journey may still enter the country. Travel restrictions for non-EU citizens are expected to remain in place through at least July 1.
 
Malta: Malta International Airport will reopen to as many as two dozen European destinations on July 1 before eventually lifting restrictions on all other flight destinations on July 15, Malta's Prime Minister Robert Abela announced this week.

Beginning July 1, Malta will permit flights traveling from the following destinations: Italy (except for Emilia Romagna, Lombardy and Piemonte), France (except for Ile de France), Spain (except for Madrid, Catalonia, Castilla-La Mancha, Castile and Leon), Poland (except for Katowice Airport), Greece, Croatia, Germany, Austria, Sicily, Cyprus, Switzerland, Sardegna, Iceland, Slovakia, Norway, Denmark, Hungary, Finland, Ireland, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Luxembourg and the Czech Republic.

Arrivals will not be subjected to COVID-19 testing but will undergo thermal screening at the airport and be asked to complete a self-declaration form providing information on their travels within the past 30 days to confirm they haven't visited any non-approved countries.
 
 
Moldova: Moldova has restricted the entry of all travelers except for nationals and residents of Moldova.

From June 30, other categories of people will be allowed to enter Moldova. These include: people with a business visit visa, long-stay visa, residence permit or equivalent document, members and dependents of diplomatic missions, consular Posts and international organizations accredited in Moldova, personnel providing humanitarian aid, passengers in transit, people traveling for health and humanitarian reasons, cross-border workers, and drivers and service personnel, for the purpose of transportation of goods (aircraft, ship and train crew).
 
Monaco: Please refer to France's travel restrictions.
 
Montenegro: From 1 June, 2020, foreign nationals will be allowed to enter Montenegro without prescribing quarantine and self-isolation measures, provided that the key criterion for entry is a rate of active coronavirus cases of less than 25 per 100,000 inhabitants in the country of which the foreigner is a resident and in the country from which the foreigner enters Montenegro. (The complete list can be downloaded from the website of the Public Health Institute of Montenegro).

Citizens of Montenegro and foreigners with permanent or temporary residence in the country who enter Montenegro from countries where the confirmed rate of active cases of coronavirus is higher than 25 per 100,000 inhabitants are ordered to be placed in self-isolation or quarantine for 14 days.
 
Netherlands: As of July 1, the European Union opened its borders to nonessential travelers from countries where COVID-19 is deemed under control. The list of countries includes Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, Andorra, Vatican, San Marino and Monaco. Chinese residents will be allowed to enter if the government confirms reciprocity. While the travel ban is not legally bonding, member countries and non-E.U. nations such as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein are strongly encouraged to implement it. Residents of other countries are barred from traveling to the EU area except for those who are EU citizens or long-term residents and their respective family members. The list of countries will be reviewed every two weeks.

The Dutch government has decided to lift the entry ban on the residents of 15 third countries, in compliance with the recommendation of the European Council published on June 30, which categorizes these countries as safe.
 
North Macedonia: North Macedonia has suspended all commercial flights until further notice and has restricted the entry of all travelers except for nationals and residents of North Macedonia. Travelers who depart North Macedonia and try to re-enter within 3 months will be denied entry.

Diplomats and travelers with special permits issued by the Ministry of Interior of North Macedonia may also enter the country.

All travelers arriving in North Macedonia must present a negative PCR test for COVID-19 performed within 72 hours prior to entering the country. Travelers must then self-isolate at home for 14 days, or for 21 days for those arriving from countries considered high risk by the Ministry of Health. Travelers arriving without a PCR test will be required to complete a PCR test upon entry and quarantine at a state institution pending the test results.

All of the above travelers must undergo a 14-day home quarantine and complete a public health information form upon arrival.

Airline crew, travelers in transit, diplomats, transport personnel, media staff, cruise passengers whose cruises started before March 16, 2020 at 8:00 AM CET on their way home, and travelers with Norwegian visas issued after March 15, 2020 may also enter the country.

Travelers are only allowed into Svalbard after they have stayed in quarantine in other parts of Norway.
 
Norway: Norway has been applying entry restrictions since March 16th, which will be lifted towards Schengen and EEA countries as from 15 July, provided that the country meets the criteria for level of infection as descried by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (NIPH). For now, the borders are closed for non-Norwegian citizens who do not reside in Norway or do not have a valid reason to enter Norway. Travelers from the Nordic countries, except from Sweden, can freely entre Norway if the country meets the criteria for level of infection as descried by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (NIPH). The situation is regularly reassessed, and adaptations of this regime are possible if the epidemiological situation requires it. Norway does not apply any restrictions to travelers departing from the country.
 
Poland: As of July 1, the European Union loosened some of their border restrictions, but Poland’s border restrictions and quarantine procedures for U.S. citizens remain unchanged. 

As of June 13, European Union citizens are eligible to enter Poland without any obstacles. Services present at the border will carry out random checks. No mandatory quarantine is imposed on EU citizens entering the territory of the Republic of Poland.
 
Portugal: As of July 1, the European Union opened its borders to nonessential travelers from countries where COVID-19 is deemed under control. The list of countries includes Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, Andorra, Vatican, San Marino and Monaco. Chinese residents will be allowed to enter if the government confirms reciprocity. While the travel ban is not legally bonding, member countries and non-E.U. nations such as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein are strongly encouraged to implement it. Residents of other countries are barred from traveling to the EU area except for those who are EU citizens or long-term residents and their respective family members. The list of countries will be reviewed every two weeks.

As of July 1, the border between Portugal and Spain has reopened.
 
Romania: As of July 1, the European Union opened its borders to nonessential travelers from countries where COVID-19 is deemed under control. The list of countries includes Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, Andorra, Vatican, San Marino and Monaco. Chinese residents will be allowed to enter if the government confirms reciprocity. While the travel ban is not legally bonding, member countries and non-E.U. nations such as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein are strongly encouraged to implement it. Residents of other countries are barred from traveling to the EU area except for those who are EU citizens or long-term residents and their respective family members. The list of countries will be reviewed every two weeks.
 
San Marino: Please refer to Italy's travel restrictions.
 
Serbia: Serbia has reopened its borders. Incoming travelers will be provided on arrival with instructions on preventing the spread of coronavirus. If you have booked, or are looking to book, flights between Serbia and another country, you should be aware that changes and cancellations are possible as flights restart.

Foreign nationals who have a temporary stay authorization in Serbia which expired after March 15, 2020 will be allowed to enter the Republic of Serbia until July 1, 2020. They can legally submit a request for extension of their temporary stay within 30 days from their arrival in Serbia.

All COVID-19 related entry restrictions are lifted for both Serbian and foreign citizens. It is no longer necessary to have a negative PCR test or special permit to enter Serbia.  The government of Serbia also abolished self-isolation requirements upon entry.  Travelers should be prepared for restrictions to change with little or no advance notice.
 
Slovakia: As of July 1, the European Union opened its borders to nonessential travelers from countries where COVID-19 is deemed under control. The list of countries includes Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, Andorra, Vatican, San Marino and Monaco. Chinese residents will be allowed to enter if the government confirms reciprocity. While the travel ban is not legally bonding, member countries and non-E.U. nations such as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein are strongly encouraged to implement it. Residents of other countries are barred from traveling to the EU area except for those who are EU citizens or long-term residents and their respective family members. The list of countries will be reviewed every two weeks.

Slovakia is beginning to relax its travel restrictions. Although its international airports remain closed, travelers from many European countries may now enter the country (nearby airports in Vienna, Budapest and Prague remain open).

In addition to Slovakian nationals and residents, as of June 20, travelers arriving from the following countries may enter Slovakia, without needing a COVID-19 test or quarantine: Austria, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, the Faroe Islands, Finland, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Lichtenstein, Lithuania, Latvia, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro, Norway, Poland, Slovenia, and Switzerland.

Those entering Slovakia from countries other than those previously mentioned must present negative COVID-19 tests not older than 96 hours upon arrival to the Slovak border police or the nearest Regional Office of Public Health and stay in home isolation for minimum 5 days until the new COVID-19 test is taken.
 
Slovenia: As of July 1, the European Union opened its borders to nonessential travelers from countries where COVID-19 is deemed under control. The list of countries includes Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, Andorra, Vatican, San Marino and Monaco. Chinese residents will be allowed to enter if the government confirms reciprocity. While the travel ban is not legally bonding, member countries and non-E.U. nations such as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein are strongly encouraged to implement it. Residents of other countries are barred from traveling to the EU area except for those who are EU citizens or long-term residents and their respective family members. The list of countries will be reviewed every two weeks.

Slovenia was the first European Union country to declare the end of the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) infectious disease epidemic.
 
Spain: As of July 1, the European Union opened its borders to nonessential travelers from countries where COVID-19 is deemed under control. The list of countries includes Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, Andorra, Vatican, San Marino and Monaco. Chinese residents will be allowed to enter if the government confirms reciprocity. While the travel ban is not legally bonding, member countries and non-E.U. nations such as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein are strongly encouraged to implement it. Residents of other countries are barred from traveling to the EU area except for those who are EU citizens or long-term residents and their respective family members. The list of countries will be reviewed every two weeks.

Spain lifted border controls with all European Union member states from 21 June, the end of the state of alarm, and will no longer impose quarantine on visitors.

While the European Union recommended to the Member States to reopen borders on July 1, authorities in Spain are planning to begin lifting restrictions for the nationals of 13 countries at least on July 2 or 3.
 
Sweden: As of July 1, the European Union opened its borders to nonessential travelers from countries where COVID-19 is deemed under control. The list of countries includes Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, Andorra, Vatican, San Marino and Monaco. Chinese residents will be allowed to enter if the government confirms reciprocity. While the travel ban is not legally bonding, member countries and non-E.U. nations such as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein are strongly encouraged to implement it. Residents of other countries are barred from traveling to the EU area except for those who are EU citizens or long-term residents and their respective family members. The list of countries will be reviewed every two weeks.

There is a temporary entry ban in place for non-essential travels to the EU via Sweden until 7 July, but travel from another EU country, a country part of the EEA, UK and Switzerland to Sweden is possible. Sweden currently has no quarantine obligation for travelers. For more information about preventive measures recommended in Sweden, please visit the FAQ page of Public Health Agency of Sweden.
 
Switzerland. travel restrictions apply to Switzerland. As of July 1, the European Union opened its borders to nonessential travelers from countries where COVID-19 is deemed under control. The list of countries includes Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, Andorra, Vatican, San Marino and Monaco. Chinese residents will be allowed to enter if the government confirms reciprocity. While the travel ban is not legally bonding, member countries and non-E.U. nations such as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein are strongly encouraged to implement it. Residents of other countries are barred from traveling to the EU area except for those who are EU citizens or long-term residents and their respective family members. The list of countries will be reviewed every two weeks.

The Swiss Federal Council decided to keep the current entry ban for third-country residents in place until July 20, despite the recommendation of the European Union Council to reopen borders on July 1. On July 20, Switzerland plans to reopen its borders to the countries listed by the council, except for Serbia.

Travel to and from other Schengen countries is authorized as of June 15 and Switzerland has lifted all COVID-19 related entry restrictions for those travelers.
 
Ukraine: Ukraine has opened its borders for citizens of all countries. However, all people coming from the lists of countries where the epidemiological situation is worse than in Ukraine have to undergo controlled observation or self-isolation for 14 days upon the arrival.

Every three days, border guards receive an updated “red list” of such countries from Ukraine’s Health Ministry. The red list includes countries where there are 40 or more COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people. As of June 17, the red list has 48 countries, including: the United States, Russia, Belarus, France, Italy, Bahrain, Peru, French Guiana, Belgium, Oman,, Sao Tome and Principe, Kuwait, Brazil, San Marino, Panama, Singapore, United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Bolivia, Chile, Portugal, Gabon, Djibouti, North Macedonia, Moldova, Ecuador, Cayman Islands, Mayotte, Honduras, Dominican Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Canada, Cabo Verde, Maldives, Liechtenstein, Guinea-Bissau, Colombia, South Africa, Afghanistan, Argentina, Guatemala, Azerbaijan, Pakistan, Israel, Central African Republic, Qatar and Armenia,

According to the State Border Service of Ukraine, the citizens of these countries will have to undergo self-isolation at home or observation in a government-selected facility upon arriving in Ukraine. Travelers who choose to self-isolate at home will have to install the state-developed app called Diy Vdoma (Apple App Store link, Google Play link), which monitors people’s location using their smartphones. Having a document certifying that the traveler recently had a negative COVID-19 test result will not wave the 14-day isolation rule.

All other countries are on the “green” list. Travelers arriving from those countries will not have to be isolated upon arriving in Ukraine. They will still need to have medical insurance that covers their treatment if they get infected.
 
United Kingdom: Individuals arriving in the UK must self-isolate for 14 days and may be contacted to verify compliance. New arrivals will be required to provide UK officials with contact and travel information prior to arrival by completing the Public Health Locator Form. This form must be completed by each member of your traveling party.

For England: You may be denied UK entry or fined £100 if you refuse to provide your contact details, £1,000 if you refuse to self-isolate, or face further action. For complete details on UK guidelines, visit Entering the UK (via GOV.UK)

For Northern Ireland: You do not need to self-isolate if you are travelling to NI from within the Common Travel Area (CTA). If you refuse to provide passenger information you may be fined £60. If you leave self-isolation within the 14-day period, you may be fined £1,000. For complete details, visit Coronavirus (COVID-19): travel advice (via NIDirect.GOV.UK).

For Scotland: Border Force will carry out spot checks at the border and can impose a fine of £60, those who fail to self-isolate can be fined £480. For complete details, visit: https://www.gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-public-health-checks-at-borders/.
 
Vatican: Please refer to Italy's travel restrictions.

Middle East North Africa (MENA)

Afghanistan: Effective June 24, Afghanistan is accepting international travelers. International carrier including Turkish Airlines, Emirate and flag carrier Ariana Airlines restarted international flights. Point-of-entry screening has been introduced. Not everyone is being screened, but those who are and who show a temperature of more than 38ºC may be sent for quarantine in one of 2 national hospitals (Kabul Infectious Disease and Afghan-Japan Communicable Disease Hospital in Kabul) or 5 provincial hospitals. These hospitals are outside of the Enhanced Security Zone.
 
Algeria: Algeria closed all land borders and suspended non-cargo international air and maritime travel as of March 17 and suspended domestic flights as of March 22.
 
Bahrain: On April 4, Manama-based Gulf Air said transit through Bahrain International Airport is open again for international travelers, but entry to the country remains restricted to citizens and residents. All visas upon arrival have been suspended. Anyone attempting to enter Bahrain must have a Bahrain residence permit or secure a visa in advance by visiting www.evisa.gov.bh.

All arriving passengers will be tested for COVID-19. All arriving passengers will be quarantined for 14 days, regardless of the outcome of the COVID-19 test.

All passengers arriving in Bahrain will immediately be taken to undergo enhanced testing procedures as a preventative measure for COVID-19 and will be subject to quarantine. Border crossing on the causeway has been temporarily suspended due to COVID-19.
 
Egypt: Egypt has suspended all international flights until at least June 30, except humanitarian, repatriation, medevac, and United Nations flights with a pre-authorization from the Egyptian Civil Aviation Authority. Aircrafts in a state of emergency or making technical landings may also enter the country. Nationals and residents of Egypt must complete a "Public Health Card" and present it to immigration upon arrival.
 
Iran: Iran has restricted the entry of nationals of the United Arab Emirates. Nationals of China and Hong Kong and Macau passport holders are no longer visa-exempt. They can obtain a visa upon arrival. Travelers entering Iran must present a self-declaration form concerning COVID-19. They will be subject to medical screening and quarantine upon arrival.

Iraq: Iraq has closed its airports until at least July 1. All travel into and out of Iraq is prohibited. Travel between Iraqi provinces is also suspended. A nationwide curfew in in effect until at least June 13, 2020.
 
Israel: The Israel border is closed for all, except nationals, residents and those with a specific entry approval from the Immigration Authority. Transit facilities at Tel Aviv (TLV) are temporarily suspended.
 
Jordan: From March 17, 2020, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering Jordan for tourism until at least July 4. This policy does not apply to personnel from diplomatic missions and international organizations; however, such persons are required to self-isolate for 14 days.
 
Kuwait: Kuwait has restricted the entry of all travelers except Kuwaiti nationals, their immediate families, and domestic workers who are accompanied by a Kuwaiti national. All of the above must have a OK TO TRAVEL authorization obtained from the state of Kuwait embassy.

Diplomatic passport holders, UN passport holders, and members of UNESCO with prior approval from government authorities may also enter the country.

All travelers must install the ‘Shlonik’ app on their personal device before departure. Kuwait DGCA will be informed of any traveler who cannot install the app, and they will have to present their boarding pass upon arrival.
 
Lebanon: Lebanon's border crossings, including Beirut Airport and its land border with Syria remain closed. The Beirut Airport will re-open on 1 July at a reduced capacity. The Government has imposed a night-time curfew. Movement restrictions, including curfew times may change at short notice. 

 
Passengers will be tested for COVID-19 upon arrival and obliged to practice home quarantine if testing positive.
 
All travelers coming to Lebanon starting from 7/1/2020 must register on the electronic platform COVID-19 MOPH PASS on the Ministry of Public Health's website (https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/988ba32e1b634902ba3b14c3e4f1614d)  

Libya: The Ministry of Foreign Affairs will suspend issuance of entry visas of all categories to foreign citizens and stateless persons for the period of the ban. The entry ban for foreigners will remain in effect until the government decree is canceled.
 
Morocco: On March 14, Morocco said it would halt flights to and from 25 countries, extending an earlier ban that covered China, Spain, Italy, France and Algeria. The countries affected are Austria, Bahrain, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chad, Denmark, Egypt, Germany, Greece, Jordan, Lebanon, Mali, Mauritania, the Netherlands, Niger, Norway, Oman, Portugal, Senegal, Switzerland, Sweden, Tunisia, Turkey and the UAE.
 
Oman: Besides Omani nationals, foreign passengers aren’t allowed to enter Oman. Oman suspended tourist visas from all countries and banned cruise ships from docking. From March 18, it enforced an entry ban on all non-Omanis, including expatriates with residency visas.
 
Palestine: Palestine does not have entry restrictions, but has begun to quarantine all travelers arriving from abroad.
 
Qatar: Until July 31, 2020, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering Qatar. This policy does not apply to persons holding a Permanent Resident Card, persons granted a special exemption, or persons accompanying Qatari Nationals. 

From August 1, 2020, this policy does not apply to pre-approved persons holding a Qatar ID / Residence Permit. All inbound commercial flights to Doha are suspended. Persons returning to Qatar must undergo a 14-day quarantine upon arrival. 

Saudi Arabia: From June 1 to June 21, 2020, domestic flights will be resumed gradually, mosques, restaurants and cafes will be reopened. Work attendance will also be permitted, but Umrah pilgrimage will remain temporarily suspended. Regional travel by bus, train, and other means of transportation has resumed.

The suspension of international flights will continue until further notice.
 
Technical stops, humanitarian, medevac and repatriation flights may still enter the country with prior approval from GACA., however travelers who have been in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Macao, Iran, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Bahrain, Lebanon, Syria, Egypt, Iraq, Italy, and South Korea in the previous 14 days will not be permitted to enter or transit the Kingdom, irrespective of visa or residency status. Furthermore, travel to/from mainland China has been suspended. The Saudi government has advised that expatriates who travel to China will not be allowed to return to Saudi Arabia.
 
All travelers entering Saudi Arabia will be placed in health isolation for 14 days following their arrival.

Syria: Syria has suspended all flights from March 22, 2020.
 
Turkey: Turkey has now lifted its COVID-19 travel restrictions. All travelers are required to wear a face mask at all times whilst in an airport, and for the duration of all flights to and from Turkey. They are also required to complete a passenger locator form prior to arriving in Turkey. All arrivals into Turkey will be subject to a medical evaluation for symptoms of coronavirus, including temperature checks.
 
United Arab Emirates: Flights to the United Arab Emirates are suspended. This does not apply to aircraft operated for the purpose of evacuation, citizens and residents of United Arab Emirates. A completed self-declaration health form must be presented upon arrival at Dubai (DXB). All travelers entering the UAE will need to quarantine for 14 days. 

Residents will be permitted to travel abroad from June 23, under new guidelines released this week. The country now has a system that will allow residents to fly abroad to certain low-risk destinations, thereby reducing the risk of importing more Covid-19 cases when they return.

Yemen: From March 17, all air flights from and to all Yemeni airports, all land entrances should be closed except for commercial, relief and humanitarian shipping.


North America

Canada: To protect Canadians from the outbreak of COVID-19, the Prime Minister announced travel restrictions that limit travel to Canada. Until further notice, most foreign nationals cannot travel to Canada, even if they have a valid visitor visa or electronic travel authorization (eTA).

These restrictions stop most non-essential (discretionary) travel to Canada. You can travel to and enter Canada if you’re a Canadian citizen, permanent resident of Canada, person registered under Canada’s Indian Act, a protected person, and 
foreign nationals who are eligible to travel to Canada. Other foreign nationals, including United States (US) citizens, can travel to Canada only if they’re eligible.
 
To be eligible, you must provide evidence that you’re an immediate family member of a Canadian citizen or permanent resident and you’ll be staying in Canada for at least 15 days. You must also have a quarantine plan that shows how you’ll quarantine for 14 days when you arrive in Canada. This plan is mandatory.
 
The United States, Canada and Mexico have agreed to extend their restrictions to keep their shared borders closed to non-essential travel until at least July 21 due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Greenland: Greenland’s police has stated that the borders to the rest of the Danish realm are closed.

United States: Foreign nationals who have visited any of the following countries / regions within 14 days of their arrival in the United States are prohibited from entering:

Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Mainland China, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Vatican City, United Kingdom.
 
For US nationals and lawful permanent residents, and their family members, those who have traveled to one of the above-listed countries / regions within 14 days of arrival will be redirected to one of 13 specially-designated airports. All persons returning to the United States from abroad should self-isolate and monitor their health status for 14 days. From March 20, 2020, the United States government has suspended the issuing of new visas. From March 21, 2020, all US land border checkpoints with Canada and Mexico are closed to non-essential traffic.
 
Land borders with Mexico and Canada are closed to all but essential travels until July 21st. 

Oceania
Australia: You can only travel to Australia if you are an Australian citizen, a permanent resident, an immediate family member of an Australian citizen or permanent resident or are a New Zealand citizen usually resident in Australia.Travellers who have a compassionate or compelling reason to travel to Australia will need to have an exemption from the Australian Border Force Commissioner.
 
All travellers arriving in Australia must undertake a mandatory 14-day quarantine at designated facilities (for example, a hotel), in their port of arrival.​
 
Foreign nationals transiting through Australia to another country don’t need to apply for an exemption to travel restrictions if they are booked to depart on a connecting flight from the same airport within eight hours and they are not going to leave the airport. If you plan to leave the airport before boarding your connecting flight, or if you will be at the airport for longer than eight hours, you will need to apply for a travel exemption. 
 
Travel restrictions are subject to change. Some exemptions are in place. Please check https://covid19.homeaffairs.gov.au/travel-restrictions-0 for more information or to apply for an exemption.
 
Fiji: Until July 31, 2020, all international flights on Fiji Airways are cancelled. Domestic flights will begin to resume May 15, 2020. A nationwide curfew from 20:00 (8:00 p.m.) to 05:00 (5:00 a.m.) is in effect.
 
Nauru: Nauru has announced entry restrictions for any travelers who have traveled from or through China, Hong Kong, Macau, South Korea, Italy, or Iran in the 21 days prior to traveling to Nauru. Nauru has also announced entry restrictions for any travelers with “direct or indirect” involvement with a vessel with a confirmed case of coronavirus, including the Diamond Princess cruise ship (docked in Japan) and the Grand Princess cruise ship (off the coast of California). Exceptions are made for travelers who have undergone medical screening and quarantine of not less than 14 days, and passed a travel history review by the Nauru Health Department.
 
New Zealand: From March 19, 2020, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering New Zealand. This policy allows for exemptions made on a case-by-case basis for humanitarian reasons, healthcare and other essential workers, citizens of Samoa and Tonga traveling to New Zealand for essential reasons, and partners or dependents of temporary workers or foreign students currently in New Zealand.

From April 9, 2020, all persons arriving in New Zealand must undergo quarantine at a designated facility.

From April 2, 2020, foreign nationals currently in New Zealand will be allowed to travel domestically in order to reach international airports in Christchurch or Auckland for outbound travel.
 
Papua New Guinea: Papua New Guinea has restricted the entry of all travelers except for health workers, flight crew, military personnel or those with a special written exemption from the Emergency Controller. International visitors should apply for the exemption, including the reasons for visiting, by contacting: covid19-admin.logistics@police.gov.pg. Anyone arriving must self-isolate in a government approved hotel for 14 days.

Travelers will be required to show evidence of their hotel reservation and approved exemption in order to purchase a flight ticket. The only airport accepting international arrivals is Port Moresby (POM). Travelers who reside in Papua New Guinea must depart from Brisbane (BNS), Cairns (CNS) or Singapore (SIN).

South America

Argentina: The Government of Argentina has announced that the national quarantine that began on March 20 has been extended through July 17, with greater restrictions in the greater Buenos Aires area. Only sporadic and specially approved international flight options currently exist in Argentina. Foreign passengers are not allowed to enter Argentina. This does not apply to nationals and residents of Argentina.There is a mandatory 14-day quarantine for any travelers arriving from countries that are affected by COVID-19.

From 24 June, some border crossings between Argentina and Chile have opened for authorised travelers with no symptoms of COVID-19 for country-to-country transit only.
 
Travel between cities and provinces remains restricted. Domestic flights, long-haul buses and trains remain suspended.
 
Movement and business restrictions have been eased in some areas. In provinces where quarantine remains, follow the advice of local authorities and stay up to date as the situation changes.

 
Brazil: Brazil has restricted the entry of all travelers who are not citizens, residents, government employees and their family members, immediate family members of citizens, diplomats, travelers with authorization from the government, travelers with a National Migration Registry, or travelers in transit who do not leave the international area of the airport. These restrictions are expected to remain in place through at least July 5. Spouses of Brazilian nationals must have a Brazilian marriage certificate can enter the country. If the certificate is not issued by Brazil, it must be apostilled by a consulate and be accompanied by a translation in Portuguese.
 
Chile: The government has closed all terrestrial, maritime and aerial borders to foreigners, Chilean citizens and residents who have visited high risk countries have to self-quarantine for 14 days after entry.
 
Colombia: Colombia has restricted entry and transit to all travelers except cargo operators, humanitarian emergencies, and extreme scenarios that have authorization from the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA). Colombia has also suspended all commercial flights into the country. All arriving travelers are subject to a 14-day quarantine.
 
Ecuador: Ecuador approved resumption of commercial flight operations beginning June 1, 2020, with limited flight capacity. All arriving passengers are required to have the results of a PCR (polymerise chain reaction) COVID test from within the last seven (7) days prior to arrival in Ecuador. If testing is not available in the departure country, arriving passengers need to sign a document promising they will undergo testing by Ecuadorian health authorities. Testing will be conducted immediately at the airport upon arrival or on subsequent days, as determined by the discretion of Ministry of Health personnel.

All passengers arriving in Ecuador will be required to comply with mandatory preventive quarantine (aislamiento preventativo obligatorio, or APO) for 14 days upon arrival. Ecuadorian citizens/residents with negative PCR results and other Ecuadorian citizens/residents in “priority” groups (children, adolescents without parents, pregnant women, those with disabilities or serious illnesses, the elderly) may quarantine at home.  
 
Ecuadorian citizens and residents with positive PCR results and who are not in “priority” groups must quarantine in government-designated temporary housing/hotels. Individuals in temporary housing/hotels can request a PCR test after seven days and, if negative, may finish the remaining seven days of quarantine at home. All travelers who are not Ecuadorian citizens or residents must quarantine the entire 14 days in government-designated temporary housing/hotels even if they present negative PCR test results. 

Falkland Islands: The Falkland Islands have restricted entry to all travelers except returning residents, work permit holders, and those with Falkland Islands (Malvinas) status. Travelers who have official business with the Falkland Islands government with proof of authorization may also enter.
 
French Guiana: French Guiana has restricted the entry of all travelers who are not residents or are required to enter for a medical emergency or to perform an essential service.
Guyana: A curfew is imposed throughout Guyana from the April 3 to May 3, 2020. All airports shall be closed to all international flights except for outgoing flights, cargo flights, medical evacuation flights, technical stops for fuel only and special authorized flights.

Nicaragua: While the Nicaraguan government has not officially imposed any restrictions as a result of the worldwide outbreak, borders and airports are effectively closed.

Officially, travelers do not need any particular documentation to enter/exit Nicaragua. Unless arriving from a country with known yellow fever risk, then one must demonstrate vaccination against yellow fever at least 10 days prior to entering zone of risk.
 
Airport and immigration officials in Nicaragua have required travelers to report if they have visited any of the countries significantly affected by COVID-19 and have requested negative coronavirus tests.

Paraguay: Non-residents of Paraguay are not permitted to transit the airport in Asuncion.
 
Peru: Passengers are not allowed to enter Peru. Airline crew must self-isolate at hotel Costa del Sol at Jorge Chavez International Airport for the entire duration of stay.
 
Suriname: From March 14 until further notice, air travel will be suspended, and land borders will be closed. All travelers will not be allowed to entry.
 
Trinidad And Tobago: Airports in Trinidad and Tobago are closed.
 
Uruguay: From March 25, foreign citizens will not be allowed entry, except for Uruguayan citizens and foreigners residing in Uruguay. Citizens of MERCOSUR member states are allowed to transit in Uruguay to travel back to their countries of origin. Until April 13, Uruguayan citizens and foreigners residing in Uruguay shall not leave the country for tourist purposes.
 
Venezuela: Venezuela has suspended all international travel.